How to Organize a Great Garden

Your area has likely seen its final frost, and if you’re anything like the folks at The Organizing Blog, you’re just itching to start a garden — either to take advantage of delicious, healthy fresh produce at low prices or to improve the beauty of your home’s outdoor spaces.

#Organizing your tools and planting supplies is the first step to an #clutter-free garden, says Lovely Greens: “Start sorting your shed, garage and garden of everything that’s standing in the way of the garden you want” by tapping the KonMari method to #declutter and prepare.

Then, visualize your ideal garden. Yours might have rows and rows of tomatoes, peppers and other crops, it might have rose bushes and ivy, or it might have an assortment of native perennials that flower and pop throughout the year.

Consider the site, Almanac says. Sunny spots work better for the majority of crops and plants (many vegetables benefit from six to eight hours of daylight every day), but you have options for shaded areas, too. Sketch out the plots on a sheet of paper or try a garden planning app.

Dedicate beds to “families” of crops. Alliums (chive, garlic, leeks, onions, etc.) can go in a bed together; squashes, melons and cucumbers in another. Remember that some plants may need support structures or protection against pests and include those in your plan.

Now for the fun part: Pick out what you want to plant. In a food-oriented garden, that means crops you’ll use and enjoy. Whatever you grow will taste better than the commercially grown, store-bought version, but  there’s no reason to grow cilantro if you think it tastes like soap.

In a flower garden, that means designing for visual impact, varying heights and colors to lend visual interest throughout the year. Fill in those empty-looking spaces but don’t crowd plants and give your garden some height by mixing low-lying plants with taller varieties.

Pay special attention to perennials whether you’re planning a vegetable or flower garden. These plants need a dedicated space where they can thrive with routine maintenance year after year; get their placement right the first time.

A well #organized garden can provide higher yields and greater visual impact. Before you start digging, have a plan in mind — and you’ll soon enjoy the fruits of your labor on the table and around the house.

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