Stock Up for Summer at the Thrift

Are you short on shorts? Lacking in linens? Generally unprepared to handle the summer heat? Check your local thrift store for lightly used garments that can help you keep your cool when the temperatures (and humidity) climb into uncomfortable territory. With a little browsing, you can stock your summer wardrobe at the fraction of the cost of retail, and since many thrifts are supplied by donations to ClothingDonations.org, shopping at them helps fund a wide range of veterans’ programs. And if you have summery items that you just don’t fit your current style, you can contact ClothingDonations.org for a pickup, too!

What to Wear at the Office When It’s Hot Outside

It’s tough to look professional in hot weather, but one’s appearance in the workplace, meetings and job interviews is as important “as a well-crafted resume or a polished LinkedIn profile,” Forbes contributor Nancy Collamer says. For women, style experts recommend lightweight neutrals such as white, tan and pale gray for sophistication and summer comfort, or a sleeveless blouse under a suit jacket. Men should try “tropical”-weight woolens and khaki cottons if a suit is required, or explore the limits of office casual. Linens are always a lightweight choice for both genders, but they do wrinkle.

Men: Stay Stylish, Not Sweaty

Men who want to stay stylish in the summer heat should opt for fabrics that breathe such as cotton and linen, says Real Men Real Style, but equally important is the weave used. Jeans may be all-cotton, for example, but they’re usually too heavy to wear in comfort when the temperatures reach the 90s; instead, choose poplin, seersucker and madras. Silk and synthetic fabrics tend to trap moisture and heat, making them poor choices. Whatever the occasion, the story adds, a straw hat can protect your skin from sun damage and discomfort by making its own shade.

Dressing for the Summer Sun

Hot, humid weather is gripping much of the nation. To maintain relative comfort during summer outings, pick the lightest-weight fabrics and colors, Stitch Fix says. Think shorts, light skirts and sleeveless tops in whites and pastels, and fabrics that breathe such as cotton, linen and rayon. “Take a take a pass on polyester (not known for its breathability) and silk,” the story says, and opt for loose-fitting clothes to keep those sweat stains away. Seersucker and eyelet weaves are solid choices for summer.

Easy Ways to Beat the Heat

With the Fourth of July festivities now complete, the worst of the summer’s heat and humidity still lie ahead for many parts of the country. While a certain amount of swelter and sweat are to be welcomed while you’re on a weekend trip to the ol’ swimming hole, many people still wilt when the temperatures rise, hiding from the heat indoors.

There are simple ways to keep cool even without the benefit of A/C, though. To keep your home cool, HuffPost says, keep the blinds and curtains closed against direct sunlight. In the bedroom, swap out flannel and fleece for lightweight cottons. Grill outside instead of cooking indoors. And be sure to set your ceiling fans to rotate counter-clockwise.

If your indoor space is still too sultry to sleep, try a few of Greatist’s “hacks” to keep from tossing and turning. Put your sheets in the freezer before bed, or put them on the mattress slightly damp—evaporation will cool the air around your body. Place trays of ice in front of your fans. And apply cold water to your pulse points before you drop off.

Your internal temperature has a big effect on how well you cope with the heat. The metabolic processes behind digestion raise body temperatures, the Daily Mail notes, so eat smaller, lower-protein meals more often. Eating spicy foods encourages sweating, which—while perhaps unsightly if unchecked—cools the body down.

While a frosty adult beverage may be appealing in hot weather, the story notes, alcohol tends to dehydrate, which may make you feel hotter. And no matter how much ice you add, caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea and cola actually increase metabolic heat, adding to discomfort. Still and sparkling water are always good options when you’re looking to cool off.

And finally, if you’re taking a road trip and worried about your car’s performance, use a protective window shade to keep the cabin cooler when parked, TripSavvy says. Then, get rid of the built-up hot air by opening the windows; close them again and blast the A/C for a few minutes before adjusting the system to a maintenance level for the long haul.

Whatever you do, don’t let the summer heat ruin your good time. Try a few of these tips and tricks, and you can make the most of the hottest days of the year while barely breaking a sweat.