June 14th’s Historical Significance

Not only is June 14 the day that the Continental Congress voted to adopt a new #flag for the newly formed United States in1777, History says, it was also the day that enlistment in the Continental Army was authorized two years earlier, making it the birthday of the U.S. Army. If you would like to support the nation’s #veterans this Flag Day, simply gather up some of your unused stuff and visit ClothingDonations.org to schedule a free #donation #pickup.

How to Dispose of a Tattered Flag

Historic U.S. flags such as the pre-1959 48-star flag can be displayed on Flag Day and other national holidays as long as they are in good condition. If you are in possession of a frayed or tattered flag, however, destroy it in the manner called “preferable” by the U.S. Flag Code: burning. Local chapters of the Vietnam Veterans of America may be able to assist with flag disposal; many collect damaged flags year-round and burn them en masse at an annual observance.

Avoid These Flag-Display Don’ts

There are a number of don’ts when it comes to displaying the U.S. flag, according to the official U.S. Flag Code. For example, the flag — in whole or in part — is not to be used as a costume, athletic uniform or apparel, meaning that the flag-festooned bathing suits, ballcaps and towels you’ll see at the beach this summer are considered more disrespectful than patriotic. What’s more, the code stipulates that temporary or disposable items should not be adorned with the flag, including paper napkins and boxes.

How to Display the Flag Properly

Flag Day is Monday, June 14, and if you’re going to display the colors, Better Homes & Gardens says, try to do so correctly. “Display the flag from sunrise to sunset on buildings and outdoor, stationary flagstaffs,” the story advises. Nighttime displays are permitted if the flag is illuminated, but displaying the flag in inclement weather is discouraged unless it is an all-weather flag. The union (blue field) should be at the peak of the staff or pole, and the flag should never touch the ground or any object below.

Planning Summer Travel in 2021

Not so long ago in 2019, the unofficial beginning of summer was the beginning of summer travel season. COVID-19 put a stop to that last year, but now that the United States is (mostly) vaccinated against the deadly disease, pent-up demand is fueling summer trips large and small.

Air travel is at almost 90% of prepandemic numbers, and with more countries overseas easing lockdowns, international travel is starting to creep upward. But as you plan your summer trips, don’t expect the fine-tuned machine that served travelers in ’19.

For one thing, you may not be able to rent a car — or afford one in your chosen vacation spot. Auto rental companies slashed fleet inventories during the pandemic to stay solvent, the Washington Post says, and may not replenish them until next year at the earliest.

Business travel is expected to rebound late, leaving the leisure traveler with plenty of options in hotels and accommodations. Rooms may be somewhat more expensive in popular locations, USA Today says, but change and cancellation fees have largely disappeared during the panemic.

For travelers who are still wary of crowded indoor environments, the great outdoors beckons. Roadtrippers.com suggests booking campsites now to avoid disappointment as pretty much everyone tries to get safely back to a new normal, travel-wise.

The road trip is still perhaps the best option for summer travel in 2021. Pack the car and take off to visit the friends and family you couldn’t last year; gas prices are up due to the Colonial Pipeline hack and other supply issues, but it remains a great way to see the sights.

Roadtripper’s planning tools allow you to build an itinerary that will suit your budget and checklist, whether your ideal trip is city or country, active or 100% R&R. The Organizing Blog can offer advice on keeping your vehicle #neat, #clean and #organized during long stretches on the road.

If you pick up any #tchotchkes or #souvenirs on your summer trips, make sure they are things that you want to use every day; otherwise, they will quickly turn into #clutter. If you are already overburdened with #stuff, take only pictures to remember your travels.

As you pack, set aside any stuff you don’t use and contact ClothingDonations.org to schedule a free, contactless #donation #pickup. It will clear your head before you take off on a leisurely weekend or bucket-list trip — and make your home a welcoming place to come back to.