Tend to Tomatoes Now for Late-Summer Bounty

Is there anything better — or harder to replicate at the grocery store — than a home-grown garden tomato? Many parts of the country are still too cool to put tomatoes in the ground, but it won’t be just a couple of weeks until seedlings have the sun and warmth they need. For best results, bury seedlings deep to cover their stems and pinch off the “sucker” blossoms that form in the branch crotches of maturing plants, The Spruce says. Give plants plenty of water and sunlight, and in approximately 75 to 90 days, you’ll have a bumper crop to share.

Start Your Garden With Root Vegetables and Greens

The final frost of the season is now history in most parts of the country, so it’s safe to sow new annuals, perennials and and edible garden. Sow the seeds of cold-tolerant root #vegetables such as carrots and radishes first, alongside fast-sprouting leafy greens such as Swiss Chard and spinach; then move on to hot-weather starter plants such as tomatoes and peppers. If you’re looking for color rather than a meal, snapdragons, alyssum and marigolds can go into your garden and window boxes now, House Beautiful says.

It’s (Probably) Time to Plant Your Vegetable Garden

Last year, there was a huge uptick in vegetable #gardening after the #COVID-19 lockdowns went into effect. If you were among those who took up a new hobby to keep busy in your extra at-home time, you know that vegetable gardening offers its own rewards in healthy, flavorful nutrition. But even if you didn’t, it’s time to put some of your favorite herbs, fruits and vegetables in the ground! Check out this handy planting calendar from Gilmour to determine when to plant in your area.

Bringing Your Garden Biodiversity

Want to make your garden ecofriendly, biodiverse and sustainable? Garden Design recommends planting an oak or native fruit tree to provide a butterfly habitat, adding a bird bath, adding a naturalized “meadow” area with native “weeds” such as milkweed, and growing flowering vines to attract hummingbirds without having to fill a feeder with sugar water. A garden tailored to your area’s climate tends to use less water and allows gardeners better options for treating pests without chemicals.

Plant Spring Vegetables Starting Now

Even before your region sees the final blast of winter, you can start planting a vegetable garden. Plant snow peas first; seeds can go in the ground four to six weeks before the final frost and be harvested in 60 days. Once the threat of a final freeze has passed, continue on to plant radishes, lettuce, and kale, SmartPots suggests; you can usually sow ungerminated seeds and harvest delicious fresh foodstuffs within a month. “Planting early spring vegetables brings both sanity to the winter-weary gardener and homegrown goodness to the kitchen,” the story says.