How to Use an ‘Extra’ Hour

Daylight Saving Time (DST) ends at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 7, when most U.S. households turn their clocks back one hour. That means people will be able to take adavantage of an “extra” hour to do whatever they see fit.

In actuality, the hour isn’t “extra” at all, having been borrowed from the clock earlier in the year to provide more daylight in the warmer months. You may feel like like going to bed earlier for a few days, but plan now to make the most of that extra time.

Dreamed up by a New Zealand entomologist and an English golf aficionado who wanted longer daylight hours for their pursuits, DST has long been championed as a way to conserve energy. Its first widespread use came during World War I as a strategy to conserve coal.

Most of the U.S., Canada, Great Britain and France never completely abandoned the practice, although it remains unpopular among dairy farmers. DST has become so popular among retailers and the general public, in fact, that four U.S. states have advanced proposals to make it permanent.

So what will you do with that “extra” hour? The first, most obvious option is to sleep though it in order to adjust to the new schedule faster. If you wake up early instead, you can use the hour to do some of the household winterizing chores you’ve been putting off.

Alternatively, you can take that extra hour and use it to #organize, #decutter and #clean a single spot in your home — a drawer, desktop, shelf, closet or room — and benefit from a newly streamlined space throughout the winter.

If you really want to thrive through the darkest months, consider making this a practice every week. Take one hour — any hour in the week — and use it to organize. You’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish if you set aside the time and make #organizing a part of your routine.

If you find any articles of #clothing, small appliances or other household items that have some life left in them, bag or box them and take one of your extra minutes to contact ClothingDonations.org for a #contactless #donation pickup.

Time is the most precious commodity we have. Take advantage of your “extra” hour this week, no matter how you choose to spend it.

Group Like Items Together at Your Next Garage Sale

The best #garage, #yard and #tag sales price items clearly and display like items together — like in a retail store — so shoppers can find the items in which they are most interested. For instance, a clothing table should have separate, distinct stacks of men’s, women’s and children’s wear; another table would group small appliances; and another would hold tools. “Departments might include collectibles, tools, furniture, sporting goods, decor, linens, kitchen electronics, books, toys and framed photos,” Angi says.

Decluttering the Home for Remote Learning

“#Organization and #clutter control are critical” to distance learning, says Boulder Valley Waldorf School. If you haven’t already #decluttered a space for your child’s remote and hybrid lessons, now is the time — COVID-19 may soon be less of a problem, but some of the changes it wrought will likely become permanent. Remove the visual chaos so that the kids can focus on schoolwork, and make #organizing a part of everyone’s daily routine. And as always, set aside anything you no longer need as you #delutter and contact ClothingDonations.org for a free #donation #pickup.

Maintenance Is Key to Organization

The key to #organization is regular maintenance, and nowhere is that more true than a child’s COVID-19–era remote learning space. Rolling carts can help kids #organize their paperwork, electronics and other supplies, professional organizer Wendy Buglio told The Boston Globe early in the pandemic: “A small rolling cart can be used to provide easy access during the school day, but can be tucked out of the way as needed.” Bins are a great option for keeping small items such as masks, chargers, pencils and pens from #cluttering the workspace.

Gifts That Help You Know Where Things Go

Half of staying organized is knowing where everything is supposed to go. To that end, blogger Abby Lawson suggests getting a labelmaker (or two) to print labels for stacking bins, kitchen canisters, file folders and other dedicated spaces. For small labels, Dymo and Brother make a number of easy-to-use, inexpensive sticky-tape systems, while larger printers offer the ability to print on clear plastic or vinyl. They make a great holiday gift for the accomplished neat freak — or anyone who aspires to get their stuff more organized in the new year.