The Hidden Dangers of a Winter Storm

Winter storm Isaiah hit hit multiple areas of the country with snow and ice over the weekend. The National Weather Service calls storms like this “deceptive killers” because most deaths are related indirectly to the storm itself. If your area is under a winter storm watch or warning, Weather Underground says, make sure you have rock salt or deicer, snow shovels, heating fuel, and adequate clothing and blankets. If signs of frostbite (loss of feeling and pale appearance in extremities) or hypothermia (shivering, memory loss, drowsiness and exhaustion) are apparent, seek medical help immediately. #WinterTips

Get Organized for Halloween

There’s no time like the present to get organized for #Halloween! Stuck for a #costume? Have a brainstorming session with the family, Modern Mom suggests, using a big pad of paper and some starter ideas such as “things that make me laugh” or “pop culture.” To create a #spooky fog, put small cups of water inside your #jack-o-lanterns and cubes of dry ice in the cups. For nighttime safety, have the kids wear glow sticks or incorporate reflective tape into their costumes. And if you can’t be at home because you’re out #trick-or-treating, place a cauldron full of small bags of candy on the front porch for kids to take.

Practice Safe Grilling for the Fourth of July

Is there anything better than a Fourth of July #cookout? If you’re having family and friends over for some warm-weather fun, remember to grill safely, says Nationwide Insurance. Place your grill on a level surface, a safe distance away from any structures and overhanging branches. If using propane, wait five minutes to relight the grill if it goes out; with charcoal, go easy on the starter fluid. Wear clothing that won’t get caught in the grill and catch fire, and keep kids away. Finally, keep baking soda or a bucket of sand handy in case of a grease fire. ClothingDonations.org and the Vietnam Veterans of America wish you a safe, healthy and happy Independence Day!

Exercise Caution When Using Sparklers

One of the most ubiquitous fireworks is also one of the most dangerous, according to USA Today. Accounting for up to one-quarter of the 12,000 fireworks-related emergency room visits every year, sparklers burn at 2,000 degrees — hot enough to melt some metals or set clothing on fire. Take extreme caution when giving them to children — especially kids under 10. Keep a bucket of water nearby to cool the spent sticks, which can remain hot enough to cause second-degree burns long after you stop spelling your name in light. Also consider safer alternatives such as glow sticks or bamboo sparklers, which cool down fast.

Safety First When Setting off Fireworks

With Independence Day coming up, the National Safety Council (NSC) warns that although many fireworks are legal, they aren’t necessarily safe. More than 12,000 people were injured in fireworks-related incidents in 2017, and two-thirds (67%) of the injuries took place in the weeks surrounding July 4. If you choose to set off fireworks this month, follow precautions such as wearing protective eyewear; staying clear of people, houses and flammable materials; keeping a bucket of water nearby for spent fireworks; and only allowing older children to use them under strict adult supervision. “Better yet, grab a blanket and a patch of lawn, kick back and let the experts handle the fireworks show,” NSC says.