Six More Weeks of Summer

With the Labor Day weekend behind us, most people (and especially people with kids) are mourning “the end” of summer. Whether or not you or your kids have to be in school, however, there’s still plenty of summer left to enjoy.

At the time of this writing, there are still nearly three weeks until the fall equinox — the official end, astronomically speaking, of the season. But many places in the U.S. won’t see real fall weather for several weeks beyond Sept. 23.

If there was a Groundhog Day in the summer, in other words, Punxsutawney Phil would likely give us six more weeks to enjoy. So there’s no reason to stop having cookouts, taking road trips and otherwise savor the season.

Take in a baseball game, BroBible suggests. Go for swim. Attend a music festival or see a summer blockbuster. Throw a Frisbee. The weather is fantastic (in many places, better than in August), so don’t let the calendar tell you when the summer fun needs to end.

Most of the activities you’ve enjoyed since June are still going strong, HuffPost says, so maintain your summer mindset into October. “Continue to have fun, to eat fresh produce from the farmer’s market, to read trashy novels, to spend time outdoors, to go for walks after dinner and long bike rides on weekends.”

There’s still time for decluttering, of course. As you squeeze in those last few summer outings and events, be conscious of what you will and won’t need as it starts to feel more like sweater weather.

For example, you’ve probably worn those white jeans/shorts/linens for the last time, so you can now safely donate them to ClothingDonations.org. The same goes for outdoor equipment you won’t be using much longer, such as camping gear and pool toys.

By the same token, you can also stock up on sweaters, blankets and household items best suited to fall festivities at the thrift stores supplied by ClothingDonations.org. The resale of #donated goods helps fund veterans programs throughout the country year-round.

Now’s the time to squeeze the last bits of outdoor merriment out of summer. As Yogi Berra once said, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over.” And summer ain’t over just because the kids are back in school!

Stay Organized All Summer Long

Everyone wants to make the most of their summer leisure time, but the added burden of managing all of that extra summertime stuff can be overwhelming. Let’s say you love going to the beach, for example. Do you really need two coolers, several inflatables and a ladder golf set to have fun?

That junk takes up space in your car and home, and you’ll have to find an out-of-the-way place to put it when summer is over. That’s why you should keep your summer stuff organized and at the ready for when you need it, while also storing only the essentials in the off season.

By this point in the season, you should have already disposed of any summer clothing you haven’t worn this year and/or didn’t wear last year by bagging it up and #donating it to ClothingDonations.org. That stuff has #cluttered your closets for months, tempting you with thoughts of summer fun — and guess what? It hasn’t delivered.

When it comes to a summer outing, try to keep the things you have to bring (and later find a place for) at a minimum. If you’re headed to the beach, pack a bag of the essentials — sunblock, towels, (deflated) inflatables and sunglasses — and keep it at the ready so the day doesn’t become all loading the car and no fun.

To keep from gathering too much stuff, the Krazy Coupon Lady says, borrow instead of buying. Public libraries are a great source of books, movies and even power tools, and when you’re done using them, you can simply return them. Another suggestion? Read digital books and magazines to keep from having to shelve your summer reading long-term. And always borrow or rent a kayak, canoe or personal watercraft unless you know you’ll use it every week.

To keep summer-only stuff from creating #clutter throughout the home, establish “drop zones,” Simplify 101 says. “A hook or shelf by the main entrance/exit of your home makes a terrific drop zone. As an added bonus, this area can also serve as a launch pad when you’re ready to head out on your next summer outing.”

Summer is all about relaxation. To maximize your R&R, make it simple for yourself, your family and friends to get out and enjoy the weather without making packing, organization and storage a burdensome chore before and long after the outing. You’ll never miss that extra stuff.

Take Advantage of Extra Daylight for Summer Fun

More hours of daylight mean more hours for summer fun. Wake up early to enjoy the sunrise, then get out and enjoy the sun by taking a long hike in the wilderness, Ecological Calendar suggests. Invite friends and family to enjoy the twilight hours at a cookout after work, or take the day off to go swimming or boating. Cool off with an ice cream cone or tall class of lemonade. Starting Saturday, the days will slowly get shorter and shorter until there’s as little as nine hours of daylight in the lower 48 states, so the #solstice invites you to make the most of summer while you can.

Set Goals on the Longest Day of the Year

You’ll cast the year’s smallest noontime shadow when the summer solstice arrives at 11:54 EDT on Friday, but that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t make big plans. Use the sun’s extended presence to get recalibrate yourself toward life goals, Vogue suggests. “Energetically, it’s a great time for a check-in,” says healer Emily Mikaelah. “Take the time to ask yourself, ‘What progress has been made on my dreams?’ and ‘Have I been doing my part to make them come into fruition?’ The fruit is ripening soon, and we want to pick it off the branch when it’s at its peak.”

Celebrate the Summer Solstice

Friday, June 21 marks this year’s summer #solstice — the longest day of 2019. Every location north of the equator worldwide will have at least 12 hours of daylight, and a few U.S. cities — in Alaska, naturally — will see no sunset whatsoever. Celebrate the sun by making sun tea, planting a garden or making a solstice feast of fresh (yellow) summer ingredients such as lemons and summer squash, WikiHow suggests. As the sun finally sets, light a candle or bonfire and keep it lit until the sun rises again, as the ancient pagans once did to honor of the gifts of dark and light.