Helping Veterans Year-Round

With Veterans Day 2021 now officially complete, remember that there is a way to help #veterans of the armed forces throughout the country every day of the year: By donating to ClothingDonations.org and the Vietnam Veterans of America. #Donations of lightly used clothing and household items are resold at thrift shops, with the proceeds going toward veterans health care, housing, advocacy and more. Donations are tax-deductible and VVA’s pickup service offers a way for donors to quickly get rid of any unwanted stuff that’s #cluttering up the home.

Keep Your Fall Fashions Clutter-Free

Saturated colors, logos and head-to-toe cable knits made a big splash on fashion’s runways this fall. But for those among us who aren’t ready to drop thousands of dollars on a single outfit, there’s another concern: how to refresh one’s wardrobe and look good for the fall season without creating more #clutter?

You may get the urge to shop as fall begins, and there’s nothing wrong with that. The temperatures are falling, and you might need new flannels, sweaters, jackets and other cool-weather clothing to wear, even if you’re working from home during the #pandemic. Specific items may need replacing after shrinking or wearing out.

As you shop, however, be mindful of the fact that every new item you buy will need to find a place in your closet or dresser. Ask yourself: Is this purchase truly necessary? Will it fuel a Marie Kondo-style sense of joy? Will I use that garment often enough to merit a spot in my limited space?

If the answer to each of these questions is yes, consider the storage space you have and what’s already in it. If you have are happy with your clothing storage and want to add a few new items to the mix, eliminate one item that you no longer use or just couldn’t work into the routine for each new item you buy.

If — as is more commonly the case — your closet and drawers are stuffed with things that you no longer like, no longer fit into or no longer use, #purge those unwanted items when you start shopping. Keep only a few essentials that you love, says Minimalism Made Simple, and your closet and mind will quickly become less #cluttered.

If you don’t have time for a complete purge, consider getting rid of two or three items for every new item you buy. That way, the overall numbers of garments owned will steadily decrease until your closet contains only successful new purchases and other items you cherish and love to wear.

As for the #stuff that doesn’t make the cut, bag up any garments that are in good enough shape to be worn again and contact ClothingDonations.org for a #donation pickup. You’ll feel good knowing that you look great and have an #uncluttered, #organized closet space while at the same time helping #veterans. That’s the way to kick off the fall season!

Observe POW/MIA Day by Donating

Observing POW/MIA Recognition Day today can be as simple as writing a card to a former POW, visiting a veterans home or donating to a veteran organization such as the Vietnam Veterans Association (VVA). Helping veterans through VVA’s ClothingDonations.org is easy: Gather up any lightly used clothing and household goods you no longer need or want and call for a free, contactless #donation pickup. VVA will resell your donated goods to thrift and secondhand stores and use the proceeds to help fund veterans programs such as the ones that identify and local MIAs’ cremains and give them a proper burial.

The Importance of Getting Vaccinated Against COVID-19

The spread of the more contagious #Delta variant of the coronavirus has many areas reeling from a dramatic rise in #COVID-19 cases, illnesses and hospitalizations. And getting #vaccinated can help slow the spread and avert more tragedies.

While no available #vaccine is 100% effective against the virus, CNBC says, all of them drastically reduce the chance of contracting a symptomatic infection and almost eliminate the chance of mortal illness completely.

Don’t think that because the first wave of the coronavirus affected the elderly worst that you’re in no danger. Delta is more transmissible, so younger people are getting infected, too — and new cases are concentrated among the unvaccinated.

One great reason to get vaccinated is to protect elderly, sick and immune-compromised friends and relatives. Even if they are vaccinated, they are safest when the people around them are at least somewhat immune to the virus and able to inhibit its spread.

Think of the #veterans in your community: Many have chronic health conditions such as diabetes that make them more vulnerable to COVID-19. When you get a #vaccine, you are honoring the sacrifices they have made on behalf of the county.

The vaccines — contrary to the misinformation campaigns out there — are safe for use. More than 4.48 billion doses have now been administered worldwide and 352 million doses in the U.S., according to Bloomberg. Serious side effects are exceedingly rare.

Many people experience a headache, fever, chills and fatigue in the first 48 hours after their first or second dose. That’s your body learning to fight off the virus. But that’s it — and what a small price to pay for months of protection against a deadly disease.

While vaccines are available free of charge, getting sick from COVID-19 can be very expensive. A coronavirus hospitalization will cost a person with no insurance coverage about $73,000, FAIR Health estimates, or max out an insured person’s deductible.

Perhaps most importantly, vaccines are the best hope for everything — school, work, social gatherings, concerts, event and even grocery shopping — getting back to normal. Don’t you long for the carefree, maskless days of 2019?

PTSD Can Affect Anyone With Trauma

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental condition that results from experiencing a dangerous, frightening, or uncontrollable event such as combat, violent crime, or a life-threatening accident. Veterans suffer from PTSD — also known as soldier’s heart, shell shock, and battle fatigue — at high rates. Vietnam Veterans of America is dedicated to getting PTSD sufferers from all U.S. conflicts the help they need to manage symptoms and related problems such as substance abuse.