Donation Pickups Temporarily Halted Due to COVID-19

The Organizing Blog regrets to inform readers that the COVID-19 pandemic has severely disrupted ClothingDonations.org’s regular donation pickup services. We are currently unable to collect your donations in all but a few areas of the country.

If you are unable to schedule a donation pickup at our websites, that’s likely because service in your area is unavailable at this time. To check on your location, call the pickup number for your state listed at ClothingDonations.org.

We will resume pickup service as soon as it is safe to do so for our donors and drivers. We encourage you to revisit the site when the social distancing guidelines designed to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus start to ease.

Social distancing and stay-at-home orders may provide the extra time you need to get started on #decluttering tasks you might have been putting off, however. Be sure to revisit the Tales From the Closet archives for advice on all kinds of #cleaning, #organizing and decluttering tasks.

Take advantage of your newfound down time to sort out the stuff you no longer need, want or find useful. Bag or box those castoffs and set them aside; we will pick them up as soon as we can resume donation pickup service safely.

We appreciate your support and patience during the COVID-19 pandemic and hope that you, your family and your friends are safe.

Sincerely,

Quentin Butcher, Business Director, Vietnam Veterans of America

Cleaning to Prevent the Coronavirus

With many parts of the nation initiating localized lockdowns against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, many readers may be wondering what they can do to help the situation as they prepare to spend more time at home.

First, don’t panic. The “social distancing” measures advised are intended to slow the spread of the virus by decreasing person-to-person transmission — and the faster they are implemented, the less impact the virus can have on day-to-day activity.

Although you may be forced to reduce participation in group activities for a short period time, purchasing six months’ worth of toilet paper and other supplies will only make it more difficult for others to access the basics. Stores will restock!

If you and/or your children are forced to stay home due to a COVID-19 lockdown at work or school, make the most of that time and do a good #decluttering. Set items you no longer need or want items aside for a donation to ClothingDonations.org.

Decluttering is a good step toward a thorough deep-cleaning, but since scientists say COVID-19 can survive on certain surfaces for up to three days, you may wish to do some cleaning and disinfecting to prevent the virus from spreading or causing an infection.

You’ll want to clean and disinfect household surfaces that get touched regularly, including doorknobs, light switches, remote controls, door handles, toilets and sinks, The Seattle Times says. Use EPA-registered disinfectants or a bleach solution to kill the virus.

Also remember to practice good antiviral personal hygiene to protect your health. Wash your hands frequently and avoid touching your face, WHO says. If you feel feverish, develop a dry cough or have difficulty breathing, seek medical help immediately.

Hopefully, these precautions will prevent COVID-19 from affecting you directly and spreading. Stay safe!

Spring-Clean During the Spring Rains

There’s no better time than a rainy spring day to “clean and organize something really well,” says Apartment Therapy. The site suggests scrubbing and #decluttering the kitchen cupboards, sorting through a linen closet and organizing the home library, but there are likely a number of areas in your home that could benefit from a carefully considered purge and wipedown. Take advantage of the weather and contact ClothingDonations.org for a donation pickup when you’re done sorting through that stuff; the proceeds from your donations will help fund veterans’ programs nationwide.

Make a Few Rainy-Day Goals

Rainy days are not only good for spring cleaning, says WiseBread, they’re good for pursuing larger goals, too. You might choose to start a savings fund, for example, or get to work on an all-encompassing five-year life plan. You might start a new hobby, or revisit an old one. A dreary day can lend itself to writing, so you might make a journal entry or catch up on correspondence. Hungry? Try a new recipe or better still, make a big batch of meals for the days and weeks ahead. Or just sleep, the story says: “If you’re the type of person who’s chronically under-rested, a rainy weekend day is the perfect time to sleep in.”

It’s Finally Spring (Cleaning) Time

Spring begins — officially, at least — tomorrow, March 20. And the news couldn’t be more welcome for people in many parts of the country after enduring what turned out to be an unexpectedly severe and snowy winter.

As the temperatures warm and the days lengthen, however, you might discover that a few things on your late-winter to-do list have gone undone. After another cold, snowy day, you may have decided the couch was too comfy to leave and binged Netflix instead of starting a new project.

Now’s the time to shake off those winter doldrums and snap into action. There is no time like right now — the very start of spring — to begin a spring-cleaning plan. Wait, and you might miss a perfect summer day.

The weather is just getting good enough for you to begin a thorough, whole-house deep-cleaning. Start with the windows; recipes for a cleaning solution vary (dish soap or vinegar and water are two good options), but authorities including Clean Mama agree that using a squeegee and lots of rags is the best plan of attack.

Once the windows are clean, the spring sunlight will reveal just what else might need a deep-cleaning. Pick a mild day and fling open those windows, then go room by room and dust from the top down, clearing cobwebs, moving to flat surfaces such as shelves and tables, and finally, vacuuming.

Once you’ve dusted and vacuumed, wash all of the linens that have been busy catching winter dirt, including throw rugs, bed linens and blankets. Vacuum and/or shampoo any upholstered furniture that has gotten dingy and dirty during the darkest nights.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the sheer amount of stuff that has piled up in the last six months, set aside some time to #declutter as you clean, the Sylvane blog says. “Clutter has psychological influences. It signals to your brain that work isn’t done.”

Put that decluttered extra stuff in boxes and bags and contact ClothingDonations.org for a donation pickup. It only takes a few minutes to arrange, and takes most of the hassles out of decluttering. Plus, the donation is tax-deductible.

Finally, wash and wipe all of the hard surfaces inside your home: backsplashes, counters, cabinets and appliances in the kitchen and bathrooms, wood and tile floors, and utility shelves. Feeling ambitious? Powerwash the garage floor and deck.

Starting is the hard part, but the beginning of spring provides a fantastic reminder that a deep-clean may be in order. Once you begin, you’ll be able to shake off the winter doldrums and enjoy a fresh, decluttered space all season long.