Maintenance Is Key to Organization

The key to #organization is regular maintenance, and nowhere is that more true than a child’s COVID-19–era remote learning space. Rolling carts can help kids #organize their paperwork, electronics and other supplies, professional organizer Wendy Buglio told The Boston Globe early in the pandemic: “A small rolling cart can be used to provide easy access during the school day, but can be tucked out of the way as needed.” Bins are a great option for keeping small items such as masks, chargers, pencils and pens from #cluttering the workspace.

Store Your Winter Clothing Sensibly

Instead of stuffing your winter clothes in the back of the closet, pack them away thoughtfully so they can serve their purpose for another year. Folded clothing can go in baskets or bins and placed on a high shelf or under the bed if you’re short on space, Apartment Therapy suggests. Use rolling racks for hanging garments, along with quality hangers that won’t cause items to lose their shape. Blankets and sheets can go in vacuum-sealed storage bags to save on space, while shoes and boots can go into a trunk or clear plastic bins. When you’re done, break out the shorts and flip-flops and get ready for summer.

Gifts That Help You Know Where Things Go

Half of staying organized is knowing where everything is supposed to go. To that end, blogger Abby Lawson suggests getting a labelmaker (or two) to print labels for stacking bins, kitchen canisters, file folders and other dedicated spaces. For small labels, Dymo and Brother make a number of easy-to-use, inexpensive sticky-tape systems, while larger printers offer the ability to print on clear plastic or vinyl. They make a great holiday gift for the accomplished neat freak — or anyone who aspires to get their stuff more organized in the new year.

Use Bins to Organize Attic Storage

Plastic stacking bins are best for attic storage, says HowToCleanStuff.net, since they can keep stuff dry and free of pests. Use bins to store non-fabric items and label them whenever possible so that you can locate what you need, when you need it. “It’s not necessary to fill each container initially,” the blog says. “What is necessary is to categorize your storage containers so they can handle future growth.” Also, be sure to review what you have in attic storage each year, weeding out anything you aren’t using or don’t want and donating it to a charity such as ClothingDonations.org.

Purge, Organize and Store Extra Stuff

If your space is stuffed to the gills with junk, a ruthless purge is the first step to a new, more #organized you, says Living Well Spending Less. “If you don’t love something, if it’s broken, if it doesn’t fit, or if you don’t use it, get rid of it!” Then, make an assessment of your storage space: Does it have room for a new set of storage shelves, hooks or bins? Deep-clean the area and invest in a uniform set of bins or boxes; then, reassemble the space, grouping all like items together. “Once you’ve organized your storage space, commit to keeping it intact,” the story says, and you’ll be able to find things when you need them while keeping #clutter to a minimum.