The Crucial Step in Closet Decluttering

One of the most important steps in #decluttering a #closet is to actually get rid of the things you no longer want, says organization guru Andrea Dekker. Once you’ve done the hard work of #sorting, #purging and #organizing, don’t backpedal on your decisions or fail to remove unwanted #clothing items from your home; you could easily reconsider your decisions and reintroduce those ill-fitting pants or that garish sweater to your shelves, creating #clutter. “Please, if you’re putting in the work to #organize your closet, FINISH THE JOB,” Dekker says. Schedule a free, #contactless #donation pickup with ClothingDonations.org, and everything will be whisked away quickly.

Ruthless Ways to Declutter a Clothes Closet

If you want to get ruthless in #decluttering your #closet, set a maximum number of hangers or limits on how many of which category of garment you will keep, says Simple Lionheart Life. You can track garment usage to ensure that only your favorites stay in rotation by turning the hangers in your closet around; after you wear an item, put it back hanging the right way. Any garments still hanging backward at the end of the season can likely be #donated. Or for a more immediate #purge, imagine yourself wearing each item of clothing or outfit when you run into an old friend or acquaintance — would you look and feel your best at that moment?

Keep an ‘Outbox’ in Your Closet

One shortcut to a #clutter-free and more #organized #closet is to place an empty box or bin in it, says Apartment Therapy. That way, when you’re trying things on and discover a #garment that you haven’t worn in more than a year or just don’t like, it can go directly into the box. It won’t be long before that “outbox” is full and ready to #donate to to a charitable organization such as ClothingDonations.org. “I had a container I wasn’t using, so it cost me nothing, and it took me about five seconds to add it to the space,” says author Olivia Muenter. “After a month, I had a full box and an emptier closet.”

Start Decluttering With a Single Closet

Don’t make #decluttering into an insurmountable task — start with just one #closet. Pull everything out and sort it into #keep, #trash and #donate piles. Clothing you enjoy wearing regularly are easy keepers, while items that are too damaged, stained or stretched-out can go directly in the trash. What goes in the #donate bag is a little more nuanced: Maybe an item doesn’t fit, never worked as part of your personal style, or was part of a too-small “goal” outfit that now only inspires anxiety, CNET says. Send those #garments to ClothingDonations.org immediately, set a new goal and reward yourself with a new outfit when you achieve it.

How to Use an ‘Extra’ Hour

Daylight Saving Time (DST) ends at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 7, when most U.S. households turn their clocks back one hour. That means people will be able to take adavantage of an “extra” hour to do whatever they see fit.

In actuality, the hour isn’t “extra” at all, having been borrowed from the clock earlier in the year to provide more daylight in the warmer months. You may feel like like going to bed earlier for a few days, but plan now to make the most of that extra time.

Dreamed up by a New Zealand entomologist and an English golf aficionado who wanted longer daylight hours for their pursuits, DST has long been championed as a way to conserve energy. Its first widespread use came during World War I as a strategy to conserve coal.

Most of the U.S., Canada, Great Britain and France never completely abandoned the practice, although it remains unpopular among dairy farmers. DST has become so popular among retailers and the general public, in fact, that four U.S. states have advanced proposals to make it permanent.

So what will you do with that “extra” hour? The first, most obvious option is to sleep though it in order to adjust to the new schedule faster. If you wake up early instead, you can use the hour to do some of the household winterizing chores you’ve been putting off.

Alternatively, you can take that extra hour and use it to #organize, #decutter and #clean a single spot in your home — a drawer, desktop, shelf, closet or room — and benefit from a newly streamlined space throughout the winter.

If you really want to thrive through the darkest months, consider making this a practice every week. Take one hour — any hour in the week — and use it to organize. You’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish if you set aside the time and make #organizing a part of your routine.

If you find any articles of #clothing, small appliances or other household items that have some life left in them, bag or box them and take one of your extra minutes to contact ClothingDonations.org for a #contactless #donation pickup.

Time is the most precious commodity we have. Take advantage of your “extra” hour this week, no matter how you choose to spend it.