Give Yourself a Dose of Digital Minimalism

Your home may be the very picture of #minimalism after you used all of the at-home time in the last year to #declutter and #donate your extra stuff to ClothingDonations.org. But your digital life may also need a good dose of minimalism. “Distracting ourselves with videos, TV episodes and quick online reads is a poor substitute for our prepandemic plans,” StudyBreaks says. Spending less time may offer you the space to tackle long-term goals, so now’s the time to do a “digital decluttering” to make time for offline pursuits.

It’s Time to Shed All of Your Possessions

#Minimalism means giving up everything you own. April fool’s! While the concept does include letting the things that don’t bring value to your life go, minimalism is really about giving yourself more time, space and freedom, Simple Lionheart Life says. You can still have a collection or hobby as long as it brings joy and satisfaction into your life — if you love and use books, for example, keep lots of books! But the #minimalist lifestyle goes beyond simply #decluttering your #stuff and can help you focus on relationships, diet, spending patterns and more.

Minimalism Doesn’t Have to Be Boring

Think #minimalism is stark or boring? Think again! When you can eliminate household décor items that aren’t meaningful or beautiful, you get a home that holds things that are of true significance to your life, Becoming Minimalist says. Photos, artwork, natural elements and travel souvenirs will create more warmth and interest than store-bought tchotchkes because they inspire memories and associations. Take a hard look at your spaces and #declutter and #donate anything that’s only there to take up space or doesn’t have a deeper meaning to yourself and your family.

Minimal and Maintenance-Free

You may find that a more minimalist life suits you after you do your spring cleaning and donate your excess stuff to ClothingDonations.org. Extend that simple, uncluttered look to your yard and outdoor spaces, says Pacific Outdoor Living, and you can keep your home spotless — inside and out — with less maintenance. Use hardscape elements such as pavers and pea gravel to frame specific areas for entertaining and planting, and include low-maintenance, drought-tolerant plants. With an occasional sweep, your outdoor space will look good all season long.