Focus Your Household Deep-Cleaning

Any #spring #scrubdown should target areas of the home that have seen heavy use over the winter, the Iowa State Daily says. Clean and deodorize rugs and carpeting, clean the oven and the refrigerator, and clean and freshen drains. Also wash the windows — inside and out, if possible — to let the sunlight in. The change of seasons is also a good time to clear out and #donate extra #clothing: “Free up space in your closet or dresser by going through old, unused items,” the story says. “If you haven’t worn something in the last year, consider #donating it to someone in need.”

It’s Time to Do a Deep-Cleaning

With the temperatures warming and trees budding, it’s time to do a deep #cleaning to keep your home #healthy and (relatively) allergen-free. If you have the time and equipment, you can do a #deep-clean in 10 days, Swirlster says. Dedicate the first two days to the living or family room, and start at the top by #dusting ceiling fans, light fixtures and vents. Proceed to dust/wipe down the walls and any pictures or decorations hanging there, as well as the blinds and drapes. Once the dust has settled (literally), wipe down the baseboards and all flat surfaces, then sweep, vacuum and mop.

Get a Headstart on Spring Cleaning

Spring cleaning is a tradition that’s likely as old as civilization itself. Certain cultures even incorporate spring cleaning into their religious practices, but the imperative is more likely a byproduct of brighter days and warmer weather. People naturally want to shake off the cold, dark days of winter and make a fresh start.

You don’t have to wait unit March 20 to begin a thorough spring cleaning, however. In fact, with unusually warm months ahead predicted for much of the U.S., it may feel like spring in your area sooner — and that means you can take advantage of the weather to make everything spotless.

The Simply Organized Home suggests starting spring cleaning in February — that’s now — with a thorough #decluttering. “There is no reason to start deep-cleaning if you are surrounded by clutter,” it says. “There is no point in cleaning things that you don’t need, use or love.”

Go through the house room by room and get rid of the things that are just taking up space — clothing you don’t want or need, small appliances you don’t use, knickknacks that hold no real sentimental value. Box and bag your lightly used castoffs and visit ClothingDonations.org to schedule a free #donation #pickup.

With that #junk out of the way, you can start #deep-cleaning. Take a single room and dust, vacuum and clean everything in it, from the window treatments to the windows to the linens to the baseboards to the floors. Proceed to the next room (not necessarily on the same day) until everything is clean.

Alternatively, Apartment Therapy has a single-day spring cleaning plan that refreshes bedding and household fabrics while also sanitizing windows, woodwork and other seldom-scrubbed parts of the home that may have accumulated dirt and grime over the winter.

Spring cleaning is a once-a-year opportunity to freshen your space and make it more livable. But you don’t have to wait — start it now, and you’ll be in a great position to fling open your windows and enjoy the gentle breezes.

Clear the Air With a Winter Deep-Clean

Spring cleaning may get most of the publicity, but there is no time like #winter to #deep-clean your house. For one thing, that’s when you spend the most time indoors, and a #clean, #uncluttered home is a happier and #healthier home. Indoor air quality improves when you dust and change furnace filters frequently. Also consider disinfecting garbage cans; cleaning windows, sills and drapes; and vacuuming under the beds. “An organized, clean home promotes an atmosphere of peace and tranquility,” says Bliss Maid. “It lifts the emotional state of most people to simply come home to a clean, #clutter-free space.”

Prepare for Six More Weeks of Winter

Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his Pennsylvania burrow last week and saw his shadow, indicating — however unscientifically — that there will be six more weeks of winter. So far, the weather has been relatively mild in the areas of the country that get snow, but if the groundhog is correct, homeowners can look forward to more sloppy, slushy weather.

As noted in previous Quick Tips, snow and salt mean more dirt inside the home. People track through with wet, snowy shoes and boots, releasing a muddy mess onto the floors. Whether you have wood, tile or carpeted floors, a little meltwater can make them look dingy fast; if left unchecked, those stains can ruin them.

To protect your floors, first clean them completely, then place a tray or throw rug at each entrance to your home. Direct your friends and family members (politely but unflinchingly), to leave their snow-caked shoes and boots in that designated area, and your home will stay cleaner throughout the season.

Dust buildup is another problem in a closed-up, heated home. Wipe down ceiling fans, picture frames, electronics and other flat surfaces, and vacuum thoroughly. You’ll probably be spending much of the next six weeks indoors, and you don’t want to spend it sneezing.

When those tasks are done, you can take advantage of your indoor downtime by starting on a few of Style Guide’s 12 Winter Cleaning Ideas. First up? Going through your clothes and deciding what to keep. “If you haven’t worn it in two years and/or it makes you feel guilty, it’s a giveaway,” the story says. Bag those items up and contact ClothingDonations.org for a pickup.

Other areas that could use some “cleaning” before spring include your budget, the site suggests. Tax time is coming up, and there’s no better time to plan out expenditures for the year ahead. Speaking of taxes, now is the time to gather up all of your receipts from last year so that you or your accountant can crunch the numbers. (Remember, that clothing donation is deductible!)

At the same time, organize paperwork and digital files so that you can continue to find the information you need when you need it. If you decide you don’t need some of those papers, so much the better: Toss them in the recycling bin.

If the weather is still miserable when you’re done with these tasks, you can get a head start on your spring cleaning by attacking some of the more detailed household chores such as cleaning windows, grout and upholstery. By the time you emerge from your burrow next month, you’ll be able to enjoy the warmer weather with a clean, organized home!