Five Kondo Tips for Organizing Small Spaces

Netflix star and bestselling author Marie #Kondo has five tips for #organizing small spaces such as apartments and condos, Urbansize says. First, work through your entire inventory, #decluttering by category. Next, use clear storage containers to find things easily — limiting the need to scatter everything to find something specific. Store similar-sized items together and use vertical storage whenever possible; shelves are more desirable than stacks. Finally, use Kondo’s “mindful” folding techniques on #clothing and textiles to make the best use of boxes, bins and drawers.

Store Your Winter Clothing Sensibly

Instead of stuffing your winter clothes in the back of the closet, pack them away thoughtfully so they can serve their purpose for another year. Folded clothing can go in baskets or bins and placed on a high shelf or under the bed if you’re short on space, Apartment Therapy suggests. Use rolling racks for hanging garments, along with quality hangers that won’t cause items to lose their shape. Blankets and sheets can go in vacuum-sealed storage bags to save on space, while shoes and boots can go into a trunk or clear plastic bins. When you’re done, break out the shorts and flip-flops and get ready for summer.

Use Bins to Organize Attic Storage

Plastic stacking bins are best for attic storage, says HowToCleanStuff.net, since they can keep stuff dry and free of pests. Use bins to store non-fabric items and label them whenever possible so that you can locate what you need, when you need it. “It’s not necessary to fill each container initially,” the blog says. “What is necessary is to categorize your storage containers so they can handle future growth.” Also, be sure to review what you have in attic storage each year, weeding out anything you aren’t using or don’t want and donating it to a charity such as ClothingDonations.org.

What Not to Store in an Unfinished Attic

When #storing extra stuff in the attic, remember that the area is subject to rapid changes in heat and humidity that can damage the things you want to store, Reader’s Digest says. Excess heat and humidity will ruin photos and fine art fast, as well as dry out wooden furniture and musical instruments. Books and electronics are also vulnerable to rapid changes in heat and humidity. Keep such items in a climate-controlled room or storage unit. To avoid fires, never put batteries, aerosol cans and other flammable items in the attic.  Attics can easily be 40 degrees hotter than occupied areas of the home.

Using Your Attic Space for Storage

Many people — especially those with older homes — use their attics for #storage. These areas offer an out-of-the-way place to keep extra stuff. Therein lies a problem, however: Once stored in the attic, stuff is out of sight and out of mind. Attics can turn into a jumble as you hastily put things there or conduct a frantic search for a single, specific item; and stuff can then turn into a fire hazard and attract pests. To safely use your attic for storage, SpaceWise says, first clear out the entire space, trash anything that’s no longer useable and donate the stuff you don’t want to an organization such as ClothingDonations.org.