The Crucial Step in Closet Decluttering

One of the most important steps in #decluttering a #closet is to actually get rid of the things you no longer want, says organization guru Andrea Dekker. Once you’ve done the hard work of #sorting, #purging and #organizing, don’t backpedal on your decisions or fail to remove unwanted #clothing items from your home; you could easily reconsider your decisions and reintroduce those ill-fitting pants or that garish sweater to your shelves, creating #clutter. “Please, if you’re putting in the work to #organize your closet, FINISH THE JOB,” Dekker says. Schedule a free, #contactless #donation pickup with ClothingDonations.org, and everything will be whisked away quickly.

Keep an ‘Outbox’ in Your Closet

One shortcut to a #clutter-free and more #organized #closet is to place an empty box or bin in it, says Apartment Therapy. That way, when you’re trying things on and discover a #garment that you haven’t worn in more than a year or just don’t like, it can go directly into the box. It won’t be long before that “outbox” is full and ready to #donate to to a charitable organization such as ClothingDonations.org. “I had a container I wasn’t using, so it cost me nothing, and it took me about five seconds to add it to the space,” says author Olivia Muenter. “After a month, I had a full box and an emptier closet.”

Streamline Your Wardrobe as the Seasons Change

Fall begins on Thursday, Sept. 22, and most areas of the country will soon enjoy cooler, crisper weather. As the seasons change, one’s wardrobe has to change, too; shorts and T-shirts won’t be of much use as temperatures tumble from summery 70s and 80s to the 60s, 50s and below.

Without getting into the weeds on what the Vogue fashionistas say is and isn’t in style this season, The Organizing Blog would like to remind readers that this transitional time is a perfect opportunity to #edit your #wardrobe.

As you reintegrate cold-weather garb into the daily routine, take a look at the #summer clothes you did and didn’t wear this year. Sort out the items you wore back into a closet or a storage bin, and trash or #donate the rest. You didn’t need them this year, and you won’t in 2023.

Summer-only clothing that makes the cut but should definitely be packed and stored for next year includes short-sleeve tops, open-toed shoes, beachwear, summer shorts, tropical prints, and linens and other lightweight garments, says The Closet Edit.

Wash or dryclean these items and store them in tucked-away baskets, plastic bins or a closet that’s distinct from your main or go-to closet. Then you can begin to integrate all of the fall and winter clothing you stored last year into active rotation.

As you make room in your closets for those fall garments, you’ll find items that didn’t get worn and shouldn’t have been stored last year. #Trash or #donate these garments unless you have a compelling reason to keep them. Perhaps you lost a few pounds and those old pants fit again?

There will also be #transitional #clothing items that you wear year-round and #accessorize according to the weather. Since they are subject to heavy use, check to see what’s going to continue to serve you through the winter, and what’s come to the end of its useful life.

As always, bag up any lightly used garments that you don’t need or want and contact ClothingDonations.org to schedule a free, #contactless #donation #pickup. We’ll take those items off your hands and resell them to fund valuable #veterans programs.

Here’s to a fashionable, #streamlined and #organized fall and winter!

Coping With Cabin Fever

Cabin fever is a natural side effect of winter. Cold temperatures, dark nights and snowstorms conspire to keep people indoors — and you can do only so much binge-watching before you start to get that unnerving, antsy feeling of being all cooped up.

This year, cabin fever is likely going to be more widespread and severe due to #COVID-19. Options for typical indoor pastimes such as a dinner out, a session at the gym or a concert are severely restricted or prohibited.

Cabin fever is more than boredom, however. “Cabin fever is a series of negative emotions and distressing sensations people face if they’re isolated or feeling cut off from the world,” says Healthline. “Cabin fever can lead to a series of symptoms that can be difficult to manage without proper coping techniques.”

Symptoms include restlessness, irritability, hopelessness, sleep disruptions, lethargy, and anxiety or depression. You will need strategies to keep cabin fever’s effects at bay when you’ve already done every jigsaw puzzle and streamed every Netflix show.

Maintain a schedule even though you’re more or less limited to the confines of your home. Include time for a variety of activities including exercise and outdoor time (bundle up if you must), and you’ll be a step ahead of the winter doldrums.

Keep your social life active at a distance by connecting with friends and family on Zoom, FaceTime or one of the other available platforms. Most people are in the same situation, so even if you feel like there’s nothing new to share, ask them how they’re coping.

We at ClothingDonations.org suggest you take advantage of the extra indoor time to #declutter. #Cleaning out a closet or cupboard and getting rid of the stuff you don’t need will not only give you a sense of accomplishment, but also help you feel more contented within your space.

People who develop severe eating disorders, sleep problems, anxiety and depression, of course, should seek professional help. But those of us who are just sick of being “stuck inside” can shake things up in little ways and make it through the winter — hopefully the last in which the #coronavirus is a major factor.

The Scariest Stuff

At #Halloween time, people love to have a little fun with the phobias that scare them. Houses get bedecked with #spectres and #spiderwebs, and children dress up in #ghoulish, #gory costumes to roam the neighborhoods’ front porches in search of free candy.

But the really #scary stuff may be INSIDE THE HOUSE. Overstuffed closets that don’t shut. Heaping toy bins. Stacks of books and papers that list under their own weight. Shelves jammed with boxes of rejects and extras. That’s right: Your house is #haunted by #clutter.

Many of the things creating the clutter may be uncomfortable to look at — clothing that no longer fits or has gone out of style, for example. It’s embarrassing to look at, so you shove it to the back of the closet and try to forget about it.

Or those extra knickknacks that didn’t find a place in your new home (and never will). Isn’t it best, you might think, to just box them up and put them on a shelf in hopes that someday they will fit in to your decor?

No! Get rid of them now, and you’ll say goodbye to those embarrassments while creating new space in your home for the things you use and love. Along the way, you’ll reduce the anxiety that having a cramped, disorganized and cluttered home can produce.

Scary Mommy says that clutter produces an ominous dread in her that’s worse than any installment of the Friday the 13th franchise. “Cleaning up clutter is not just another thing on the to-do list like packing my kids’ lunches. It’s a full-on ragey kind of panic.

“It’s the feeling that I literally can’t breathe with all the clutter that’s filling our house,” she says. “It’s a feeling that the world is a chaotic place that I can’t control, and all of that chaos is represented by the loud, unruly, angsty wreck that is my living room.”

Chaos is scary. But the #decluttering process is also scary, because it demands that you go through all of that broken, disused and extra stuff and make snap decisions about what can stay and what should go.

In the spirit of the season, resolve to face those fears. Pick a disorganized, overstuffed shelf, closet or room and begin. It may be uncomfortable, embarrassing or frightening at first, but as your space slowly gets more organized, you’ll feel the anxiety lift.

If you find anything that may still be useful to other people as you declutter, bag it up and contact ClothingDonations.org for a donation pickup. Like giving out candy, you’ll be cheered to donate something knowing that it will assist veterans year-round.

And that may just make decluttering feel like a trick and a treat. Happy Halloween!